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Posts from the ‘Retirement Planning’ Category

21
Feb

Protecting Investments for Your Heirs

Many investors over the age of 60 find themselves in a quandary regarding investments that they intend to leave to their heirs.  The primary concern involves the desire to conserve the investments they are bequeathing while at the same time earning a reasonable rate of return.  As we all know, the volatility of the equity markets can be cruel and this can be most detrimental when investments do not have time to recover after a downturn.  As a result, many mature investors choose to accept low rates of return in order to avoid loss in the funds they wish to leave to family members.

If you share these concerns, then Segregated Funds (also known as Guaranteed Investment Funds) may be the solution.  Segregated Funds are similar in performance and cost to Mutual Funds but come with some very attractive advantages.  Since Segregated Funds are offered by life insurance companies, they contain guarantees both at maturity and at death.  Read more

18
Oct

Segregated Funds for Estate Planning

As we age and our thoughts turn to estate planning, Segregated Funds may present a valuable planning opportunity.  As we progress through the stages of life our investment focus changes from growth to income to preservation.  Usually, the expected rates of return reduce as we age, primarily because we have less time to make up for a loss and feel the need to be more conservative in our approach.  Anyone who has retired shortly before or after a major market correction (or crash!) understands the impact volatility can have on their enjoyment of a comfortable retirement.

In addition, none of us want to leave an estate for our heirs which could be a fraction of what was intended or be a catalyst for family discord.   Fortunately, you do not have to forego the opportunity of growth in order to preserve the capital that you wish to leave to your family.  Segregated Funds not only protect your estate against market fluctuations, they also provide the comfort of knowing the inheritances you wish to leave will be received by those for whom they were intended.

What are Segregated Funds?

Segregated funds are similar to mutual funds and represent market- based, equity, bond or fixed income investments.  They differ from mutual funds in that as they are offered by life insurance companies, they have special benefits that mutual funds do not.  These special benefits include: Read more

19
Jun

After death of spouse, CPP survivor’s benefit can be a shock

Here’s an important article I wanted to share from CBC News. It addresses some of the scenarios widows and widowers could face if they continue to be reliant on CPP after the death of a spouse.

You can read the article on the CBC Website

9
Feb

TFSAs aren’t just for short-term savers anymore

It’s been a decade since the TFSA was born. It’s grown up quite a bit over that time.

By Bryan Borzykowski for MoneySense.ca

It was hard to know it at the time, but February 26, 2008 has become one of the most significant dates in Canadian investing history. That afternoon, Jim Flaherty, then Minister of Finance, unveiled the Conservative party’s budget and, for the first time, mentioned the Tax-Free Savings Account. On January 2, 2009, the first TFSA was opened and $5,000—the maximum contribution limit that year—was deposited by some savvy investor.

When Flaherty introduced the TFSA, he listed a variety of ways someone might use the account. An RRSP, he said, was meant for retirement savings. A TFSA, where after-tax dollars can grow tax-free, was “for everything else in your life,” like buying a first car, saving for a first home and setting aside money for a “special project” or a personal indulgence. With contribution room only increasing by $5,000 per year for the first few years, using it to save for something made a lot of sense.

Read the rest of the article at www.moneysense.ca